Posted in: Review

Paint

Writers need to be read. Musicians need to be heard. But after three years of painting, Dan, Kelsey and Quinn haven’t hung a picture on anybody’s walls but their own. Are you still a painter if nobody sees your paintings? Is selling out worse than not selling at all? Paint asks those questions, and lets […]

Posted in: Review

The Mimic

From the moment it starts, The Mimic, which is based on a true story, establishes a fanciful tone built on rapid-fire dialogue and deadpan wit. Yet while the movie has the odd poignant moment, it works best as a thought exercise. The film centers on The Narrator (Thomas Sadoski), who not only narrates the film […]

Posted in: Review

Moxie

Since time immemorial, girls have spent their high school years dealing with harassment from their male classmates; girls’ school sports are frequently underfunded compared to their male colleagues; girls’ dress codes are more strenuously enforced than boys’; and required reading assignments are weighted towards white male writers at the expense of more diverse writers. In […]

Posted in: Review

Tom & Jerry

If Tom & Jerry feels retro, that isn’t because it harkens back to the gleeful anarchy of the duo’s original animated shorts, since it rarely does. Instead, this slapdash cinematic lark feels like a holdover from another era, lost in a time capsule of style and perspective. It might most resemble the late-‘90s/early-‘00s string of […]

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The Father

In the latter years of my grandfather’s life, he began to exhibit some mild signs of dementia but, mercifully, it never deteriorated beyond that. He wandered into confusion, but never drifted so deep that he couldn’t be reeled back. Florian Zeller’s The Father is all about that tragic drift, inexorable and all-consuming, memories and perceptions […]

Posted in: Review

Parallel Minds

Most movies struggle to come up with one good idea. The sci-fi thriller Parallel Minds has a handful. There’s one about a high-tech contact lens that lets you see your own memories. There’s another about a First Nations woman with psychic powers, and a half-remembered past.  There’s a third about an artificial intelligence that’s become […]

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Donna: Stronger Than Pretty

When Donna and Nick got married, they pledged to be together forever, for richer or poorer, for better or worse. Except it gets worse pretty quickly. Unfortunately, so does their movie. And unlike Donna, audiences are unlikely to stick around, hoping it’s going to get better again. Donna: Stronger Than Pretty is a portrait of […]

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Nomadland

Chloe Zhao’s Nomadland traverses both the physical and philosophical implications of a very specific cultural bubble: the culture of willful itinerants, those individuals who live off the grid, untethered to anything permanent, the antithesis of what most of us would consider “normal.” The film’s title craftily lends this lifestyle its own spatial resonance in modern […]

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I Care a Lot

Marla Grayson (Rosamund Pike) is a terrible person. The scam that she runs isn’t illegal, exactly, but it’s immoral and unethical and just plain mean. Marla targets vulnerable senior citizens who have little to no family connections and possess substantial financial assets, and she colludes with a doctor to get a court to declare those […]

Posted in: Review

79 Parts

It’s not easy to make a convincing period piece on a small budget, but director Ari Taub pulls it off surprisingly well with his 1970s-set crime drama 79 Parts. This is the kind of movie that lets the mustaches and accents do most of the work, but it’s full of entertaining mustaches and accents, attached […]

Posted in: Review

Minari

Minari is a simple plant, sometimes referred to as “water celery.” It’s a wild green that’s bountiful growth makes it ubiquitous in East Asian cooking, particularly in Korean cuisine. That growth makes it uniquely special – its seeds will grow anywhere, even in what would appear to be inhospitable environments. The America of present day […]

Posted in: Review

Saint Maud

Saint Maud, writer-director Rose Glass’ debut feature film, is a fascinating, at times frustrating meditation on faith, mental illness, loneliness, and connection. The story centers on a young live-in hospice nurse who calls herself Maud (Morfydd Clark) and has taken on a new patient, Amanda (Jennifer Ehle), a former dancer and choreographer with Stage 4 […]