Posted in: Review

Kin

It’s no surprise that directing brothers Josh and Jonathan Baker expanded Kin from a short film (their 2014 effort Bag Man), because there clearly isn’t enough in the story to sustain a feature film. A morose drama about two delinquent brothers, Kin occasionally stops to check in on an underdeveloped sci-fi movie along the way, […]

Posted in: Review

Searching

Russian filmmaker Timur Bekmambetov has been quietly building a niche for himself as the producer of a subgenre of movies he dubs “screen life,” including the two Unfriended movies and the new thriller Searching. Like the Unfriended movies (and the upcoming Profile, which is currently on the festival circuit), Searching unfolds entirely on computer screens, […]

Posted in: Review

The Happytime Murders

The easiest way to process the abject failure of The Happytime Murders is to know that those Taco Bell “nacho fries” commercials are more successful conceptually than this movie. Purely on the basis of comparing similarly threadbare concepts, the nacho fry commercials – presented as trailers for a conspiracy theory thriller that will (prayerfully) never actually […]

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Minding the Gap

When Bing Liu first started shooting footage for what became his debut documentary feature Minding the Gap, there’s no way he could have known what he would end up with. At first he was just making some cool skateboarding videos with his friends Keire and Zack, and along the way he documented the painful process […]

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BlacKkKlansman

Spike Lee’s vital importance to the history and progression of American independent cinema lies in his boldness. It’s a boldness of suppression finally set free, of ideas long-simmering brought to a boil. Historically, Spike Lee “Joints” crackled and burned with a passion and anger that was never before seen, because the people in Lee’s films […]

Posted in: Review

The Meg

The Meg is like a time capsule from 1998, the sort of patently ridiculous but nevertheless stolidly earnest wannabe late-summer tentpole that’s so mind-numbing that at least the act of watching isn’t too painful. A motley team of stereotypes faces a grand disaster scenario and, with the indefatigable guidance of an uber-masculine veritable superman, saves the […]

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Christopher Robin

Disney’s mania for reimagining all of its successful animated properties as live-action movies takes an odd turn with Christopher Robin, which places lovable bear Winnie the Pooh and his animal friends in the real world, where they come across mostly as creepy and sad. It’s also a little unsettling to see the title character, who […]

Posted in: Review

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot

The life of cartoonist John Callahan seems tailor-made for an awards-friendly biopic: Paralyzed in a car accident at age 21, Callahan triumphed over adversity on multiple fronts, as a quadriplegic and an alcoholic, and created work that was provocative and often controversial. Writer-director Gus Van Sant delivers a disjointed portrait of Callahan’s life in Don’t […]